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Previewing the New Google AdWords Interface

Published June 15, 2017
We all need a new look sometimes. Maybe it’s a haircut or a new pair of glasses; other times it’s a full makeover. Well, Google AdWords is no different, undergoing its very own facelift over the last few months.
As you may have noticed, Google AdWords has been gradually rolling out a new interface, giving select accounts beta access over time. This represents one of the largest overhauls of AdWords’ visual appearance since its launch. While the overarching process of management remains the same, even aesthetic changes can take a little getting used to. If you haven’t had a chance to re-familiarize yourself with the new face of AdWords, we took some time to go through what’s new, what’s moved and what’s similar to the current interface, with screenshots along the way.
Let’s take a look.

 

 

Defining Key AdWords Metrics

Published June 8, 2017
Spending money on marketing is not new. But with digital advertising, especially the paid options available in Google, for every dollar you lay out, you can figure out how much you’re getting back. From actual revenue to gauging exposure, AdWords gives you extensive insights. You may still have to “spend money to make money,” but at least here you can make sure your money is working smarter.
But to do this, which metrics should you care about most when reviewing AdWords performance? With so much data it’s sometimes hard to tell. For starters, take a look at the sheer number of options you have in the interface for viewing metrics.

 

 

You can add scores of metric columns via the interface, but more isn’t always better. For looking at top level data, there are a few specific metrics you should care about to pinpoint success.

In this article, we’ll review the top AdWords metrics and what they mean for your account, while helping you focus on what numbers matter most to your business’s bottom line.

Reaching Users in Their Inboxes with Gmail Ads

Published May 4, 2017
Gmail, the email provider created by the search juggernaut Google, has over 1 billion monthly active users . Think about all of those people, checking their inboxes multiple times a day just waiting for a new message to arrive. What if your brand could use this massive user base to spread your message and attract new customers?
Good news! You can.
Gmail advertising allows you to show ads directly within your audience’s inbox, reaching people as they’re checking email throughout the day. Ads appear right above messages in a highly visible location, similar to an email subject line. You can put offers in front of people, when they are engaged, attracting clicks and sales without even having to actually send an email.
In this article, we’ll review how Gmail ads appear, how to create a campaign, and what tactics to use for the most effective targeting. Let’s start by looking at how Gmail ads show up in the inbox.

 

 

How to Create Google Display Ads

Published March 21, 2017
A Google Display Ad is a pre-designed ad that appears on one of the websites in Google’s extensive network of participating websites. These ads have the ability to appear in front of users while they are shopping, doing research or even watching videos of dogs doing tricks. They appear in front of potential customers where they are actively browsing online and can be very effective in gaining attention and clicks.
But, only if they are done well.
In a previous article, we covered how to build a successful display Google AdWords campaign. In this article, we’ll delve more deeply into how to create the display ads that run within your campaign, while also providing advice for the most effective ads.

 

 

How to Launch Your First AdWords PPC Campaign

Published March 9, 2017
There’s a first time for everything.
The first time you tried caviar and discovered it’s an acquired taste. The first time you drove a new car and figured out just how sensitive the brakes are. Every time you try something new, there’s a learning curve and nothing is perfect right out of the gate.
In PPC (pay-per-click) advertising, when you’re diving in for the first time, the amount of information can quickly become overwhelming. But don’t worry, we’ll walk you through getting started.
While there are countless settings in the backend of Google AdWords to fine-tune campaigns, you should begin by seeing the setup process as a series of high-level steps. You won’t become a seasoned PPC account manager overnight. That takes time and experience. But you can begin wading into the waters with an AdWords account and building a basic campaign.
In this article, we’ll talk about how to work with a client to understand their goals and plan out a paid search campaign. Let’s start by talking with your client about their business.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?

The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.

Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.
Digital marketers spend a lot of time focused on PPC and SEO campaigns in order to drive desirable traffic to a website. The phrases we’re ranking for and bidding on get meticulous attention, so much so that we often forget about some of the other ways that visitors find us.

We put a tremendous amount of the effort we put into reviewing organic search data and PPC campaign performance in analytics. But how closely do we monitor referral reports?

If that’s not a channel you review regularly, you may be missing out on seeing traffic that is coming directly from links you’ve obtained around the web, local business listings, news mentions, and more. Many times, links are only considered as a means to an end, a metric that Google uses in determining how to rank sites in the SERPs (search engine results pages). But the fact is, many of a site’s links may be directly contributing to its traffic.

In this article, we’ll review how to look at referral reports in Google Analytics, and some of the many ways to use that data to better inform your web marketing decisions.