BLOG

Why Your Agency Should Create Monthly AdWords Reports for Clients

Published June 6, 2018
Agencies like to provide pay-per-click (PPC) services like AdWords because they can often be used to achieve results for clients quickly. Likewise, outsourcing the management of PPC campaigns to an agency is an attractive option for businesses that do not have the necessary expertise in-house.
 
In addition to running effective campaigns for your clients, your agency should also take the time to create and send each of them a monthly AdWords report. Sending regular reports allows you to demonstrate your AdWords expertise, builds trust through transparency and often uncovers opportunities to sell your clients additional services.

Some agencies avoid sending their clients AdWords reports because it can be time-consuming but skipping this opportunity for client communication is a mistake. This post explains why reporting is time well spent, what agencies should include in an AdWords report, and how you can streamline the reporting process to make it as efficient as possible.

4 Tips for Mobile Search Advertising

Published April 24, 2018
We have now been living in the “age of mobile” for quite some time. We talk incessantly about mobile. Our mobile devices have become nearly attached to our hands and yet some businesses and agencies are still lagging a bit behind with their overall focus on mobile-specific search.
Being behind on some trends means missing them altogether, being behind on mobile adoption means being late to a digital revolution. Being fashionably, or at this point unfashionably, late to this party is actually costing businesses money. This is particularly true when it comes to paid search campaigns that include little to no differentiation between mobile and desktop searchers.
Fortunately, it’s not too late to tweak campaigns and ad groups to improve the mobile experience for potential customers. In this post, we’ll cover a few basic tips for maximizing the value of your ads in mobile search.

An Example AdWords Report Template for Agencies

Published March 18, 2018
A common question asked by digital marketing agencies is what should be included in a client's AdWords report?
 
Your agency probably creates and manages AdWords campaigns for a variety of clients. Your activities may involve keyword selection, bidding strategies, ad creation, conversion tracking, and optimization. If its an E-commerce client, maybe you even manage to a target return on ad spend (ROAS).
You cannot really communicate detailed metrics on all the activities that you perform for a typical AdWords client. The client would be overwhelmed by detail! Instead, you need to focus on a few key performance indicators (KPIs) that provide your client with the information they need in order to make good business decisions.
 
Of course, the primary rule of reporting is to develop KPIs that are customized to each client's business. For AdWords reporting, that means you need to provide big picture numbers like total leads, clicks, conversions, spend, etc. But, you also need to drill down, so the client can see data at the campaign, ad group, ad, and keyword level. While the big picture numbers tell your client if their goals are being met, the details help with allocation decisions like moving spend from display to search ads or eliminating poorly performing ad copy.
 
Creating such a report from scratch for each client can be a time-consuming and intimidating task. Fortunately, Megalytic provides a simple interface for creating AdWords report templates. Creating an AdWords report template provides your agency with a starting point for future reports. For each new client, you can begin with the template, and customize it to create an AdWords report meeting the specific needs of that client.
 
Whether or not you decide to use Megalytic for reporting, here are some important ideas to consider when creating an AdWords report template for your agency.

Return on Ad Spend (ROAS)

Published March 7, 2018
Return on Advertising Spend (ROAS) is a term you encounter all the time when working on advertising optimization. There is even a Google Analytics metric named ROAS and you can use Target ROAS as a bidding strategy in AdWords.
So, what is ROAS exactly? To start, the ROAS formula is defined as the ratio of the revenue generated by advertising over the cost of that advertising.
 

ROAS measures how much of your advertising spend you got back in revenue. ROAS is never a negative number because in the worst case your ads produced 0 revenue and ROAS would be zero.

So, what's a good ROAS? The answer is that it depends on the operating margins, cash flow, and other aspects of your business. In this post, we examine how to know what your ROAS needs to be and how to use (and not misuse) ROAS as a guide to managing your advertising spend.

Managing an International PPC Campaign

Published July 13, 2017
One of the most exciting things about the digital age is its contribution to growing the global community. We are all more connected and more accessible to one another than we have ever been. While that is monumental for social and political reasons, it also fundamentally changes our ability to do business internationally. 20 years ago a U.S. business may never have considered a customer base in Beijing. Today, it’s happening every minute.
Taking a brand worldwide creates new potential for revenue but it also adds a new level of complexity to your marketing strategy. You have to understand language, cultural and legal nuances to effectively reach people in various countries. When you’re dealing with online advertising, you have to understand how targeting and bidding will be impacted by expanding into other countries.
In this post, we’ll cover tactics for reaching an international audience via PPC advertising. First, start by thinking about how international targeting relates to your campaign structure.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.