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Agency Markup for Advertising Reports in Megalytic

Published September 6, 2019

Agencies that provide advertising services for clients often get paid by marking up the cost of that advertising. For example, the client and agency may agree to run a Facebook advertising campaign and the client will pay the agency the Facebook ad costs for the campaign plus 15%. That additional 15% is referred to as the "markup".

An Example Instagram Report Template for Agencies

Published December 21, 2018

2018 was the year that Instagram became a major internet marketing platform, with nearly 1 billion users. If you didn’t already have a brand presence on the social media platform, you probably started one, or wanted to. Both organic posts and paid advertising on Instagram can bring great value to your brand’s marketing program.

Once you get your Instagram campaigns up and running, you are probably wondering how best to determine their performance. You want to be able to demonstrate the value of these campaigns and know where you’re doing well and where you can improve for the future. You’re probably going to start doing a monthly report on Instagram performance, but luckily, this is not a difficult process. It’s very similar in many ways to other reports you may already be producing. In this post, we’ll present a template to help you jump start your Instagram reporting.

Google Search Console Data That Agencies Should Share With Clients

Published August 21, 2018
There are lots of ways to drive traffic to a website these days – social media, pay-per-click ads, display ads, email marketing, etc. But, for many websites, organic search remains the largest source of traffic.
 
As an agency, you need to help your clients understand what’s driving organic search traffic to their websites and how they can grow that traffic. This means you need a source of data that measures organic search traffic. For traffic from Google Search, there is an excellent free tool from Google providing that data: Google Search Console (GSC). While other tools "scrape" data from the Google search engine result pages (SERPs), GSC provides the official data from Google.
In this blog post, we’ll look at what kind of data you can pull from Google Search Console, how to use it for SEO, and how to best share it with your clients.

6 White Label Reporting Features that Agencies Need

Published August 13, 2018
Marketing agencies now use many different software tools to do their jobs, including reporting tools. Some agencies worry that their clients might see branding from a tool company on their reports, misunderstand, and think that their work is being subcontracted. Other agencies believe that the tools they use provide a competitive advantage and would prefer that clients and third parties not be able to determine which tools are being used.
 
These are a couple of the reasons why agencies look a reporting system that they can “white label”. White labeling means adding your own branding to another company’s product so you can present a unified front to your clients. When applied to a reporting tool, this is called white label reporting.
 
White label reporting is important for your agency’s branding efforts. If you’re not including your branding with your reports, you’re missing out on an opportunity to strengthen your brand and add a personalized touch. Since clients will be looking at your reports regularly, that’s a lot of brand reinforcement. Also, if you offer an agency dashboard for your clients, adding your branding to that will also give a boost to your agency.
 
Furthermore, some of your clients may want to see their own branding on the reports. Or, maybe a combination of client and agency branding.

But what white label features do you need in your reports and dashboards in order to support your agency’s branding needs? In this article, we’ll be look at 6 of the most important. These are the features your reports need in order to serve as a face for your company’s deliverables.

How Agencies Use Client Reporting to Sell More Retainers

Published August 7, 2018
All new digital marketing agencies, indeed all new businesses, seek a steady flow of cash. In the beginning, this might be done by trying to get as many clients as possible. That’ll work in the short-term, but it’s a bad long-term strategy.
 
Working a constant stream of one-off projects is no way to make your agency’s cash flow steady. The way to overcome this is to convince your clients to hire you on retainer. To do this, you must show your clients that you offer value over time and that keeping you on-call is in their best interests.
 
How do you do this? How do you sell marketing retainers? It’s all about client reporting. 

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When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?

The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.

Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.
Digital marketers spend a lot of time focused on PPC and SEO campaigns in order to drive desirable traffic to a website. The phrases we’re ranking for and bidding on get meticulous attention, so much so that we often forget about some of the other ways that visitors find us.

We put a tremendous amount of the effort we put into reviewing organic search data and PPC campaign performance in analytics. But how closely do we monitor referral reports?

If that’s not a channel you review regularly, you may be missing out on seeing traffic that is coming directly from links you’ve obtained around the web, local business listings, news mentions, and more. Many times, links are only considered as a means to an end, a metric that Google uses in determining how to rank sites in the SERPs (search engine results pages). But the fact is, many of a site’s links may be directly contributing to its traffic.

In this article, we’ll review how to look at referral reports in Google Analytics, and some of the many ways to use that data to better inform your web marketing decisions.