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Post-Holiday Metrics: Data To Capture This Season

Published December 21, 2017
This season, one of the best gifts any business can receive is new data. All of the days, weeks and months leading up to the holidays contain useful information that can be captured and should be applied to future initiatives. So, as this year’s season wraps up and we begin looking forward to what the New Year brings, don’t forget to look back at efforts and analytics to find out what kinds of insights have been left in your digital stocking.
 
In today’s post, we’ll cover some of the information that deserves documentation to get a head start on what to do and what to expect next year. 

Helpful Chrome Extensions for Digital Marketing Professionals

Published February 2, 2017
As digital marketers we’re always on the hunt for ways to improve speed and efficiency without sacrificing the analysis that leads to those campaign defining “Aha!” moments. That’s why there is an entire industry comprised of tools and platforms designed to make our jobs easier. One part of that industry is browser extensions that are created to provide at-a-glance details in a consolidated view.
While they may not necessarily make our work less complex, a number of these extensions can help you streamline tasks like testing analytics configuration and analyzing SEO metrics. In this article, we’ve listed several Chrome extensions that we recommend for improving your digital marketing workflow.

 

 

How to Set Up Facebook Ads Conversion Tracking

Published December 15, 2016
When social media marketing first started, it was often seen as a way to merely “be present” or to help spread awareness about a brand by being a part of the conversation.
As social media platforms have evolved, so too have the opportunities to grow a business and produce revenue as a result of social media-related efforts. While social content may continue to be a mixture of interesting tidbits, attention getters and demonstrations of culture, other posts, and paid ads in particular, can provide strong calls to action and drive new business.
Facebook has also become an increasingly valuable platform for reaching target consumers outside of standard search and display advertising. The ability to layer demographic targeting criteria like age, gender, interests, occupations and income has allowed for incredible granularity in getting your message to potential customers.
This combination of features gives us the chance to equate our Facebook activity with actual income. But only if we’re measuring it properly.
In proving the effectiveness of advertising on Facebook (as with any other channel), the bottom line of success often comes down to conversions. Ultimately, you want to look at which campaigns, ad sets, and ads were the most effective in motivating people to download resources, submit contact information or make a purchase.
Thankfully, the Facebook Pixel offers a clear solution for tracking these results. This code snippet is a one-stop solution that, once installed, allows you to create remarketing audiences and track multiple conversion points across your site.
In this article, we’ll review how to set up the Facebook Pixel on your site and configure conversion tracking within the Facebook Ads interface.

 

 

Grow Your Digital Marketing Agency Using Key Data Points

Published October 21, 2016
No one wants to be treated like a number. It’s even awkward at a deli when you answer to “Number 37!” to order your turkey breast. But let’s be real: When it comes to business, making informed decisions requires you to be able to peel away the intangibles and focus on the cold, hard data.
Developing a digital marketing agency into a profitable business takes a combination of dedication, knowledge, and business skills. Certainly, leadership and culture play an important role in success, but one of the most crucial business skills a decision maker needs is the ability to understand data that relates to the core growth of an agency and what metrics to track for accurate measurement of results.
In order to truly understand the value of your agency’s online and offline engagement with potential customers, you must establish a framework that allows you to properly evaluate how your brand is growing and how various channels are contributing. In this article, we’ll cover a few key data points you should monitor to help build your agency.

 

 

Identifying & Reporting Facebook KPIs

Published May 19, 2016
As Facebook grew to become a dominating online destination for users across all demographics, you could almost hear the stampeding sound of businesses rushing to secure a foothold there. Facebook celebrated its 12th birthday this year, so by now we all have a better understanding of how to use it as a channel to drive business. Right?
When marketing a brand through Facebook, it’s easy to get distracted by the ideas and the strategy. It’s easy to lose track of what ultimately matters for success. So what metrics do you want to point to when your client asks for a quick breakdown of how a marketing campaign is performing?
The difference between being on Facebook and succeeding on Facebook is largely about identifying KPIs and framing everything you do, from posting to reporting, around those metrics.
For a quick review, a KPI is a key performance indicator: a metric you choose to determine success for your marketing campaigns.
When establishing KPIs, keep in mind a couple of important considerations:
  • Don’t focus solely on one factor; consider multiple metrics together. For instance, likes alone are far from the key to Facebook success.
  • Think about how KPIs relate to your overall business goals. While direct conversions are the ultimate goal, Facebook is a prime opportunity for brand exposure and awareness. You want to make sure that people recognize and respect your brand online, and in that vein, willingness to share and engage with your content shows that people are noticing and interacting with your brand.
  • Choose KPIs that you can benchmark against over time as they change. Your own historical data is the best place to look in knowing whether the numbers you see correlate to success.
While the KPIs you choose to measure and report on may not necessarily be the same as another brand’s most valued metrics, we’ll cover some common KPIs for Facebook. While reviewing these, think about how these KPIs can correlate to your online business goals.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?

The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.

Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.
Digital marketers spend a lot of time focused on PPC and SEO campaigns in order to drive desirable traffic to a website. The phrases we’re ranking for and bidding on get meticulous attention, so much so that we often forget about some of the other ways that visitors find us.

We put a tremendous amount of the effort we put into reviewing organic search data and PPC campaign performance in analytics. But how closely do we monitor referral reports?

If that’s not a channel you review regularly, you may be missing out on seeing traffic that is coming directly from links you’ve obtained around the web, local business listings, news mentions, and more. Many times, links are only considered as a means to an end, a metric that Google uses in determining how to rank sites in the SERPs (search engine results pages). But the fact is, many of a site’s links may be directly contributing to its traffic.

In this article, we’ll review how to look at referral reports in Google Analytics, and some of the many ways to use that data to better inform your web marketing decisions.