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Facebook Lookalike Audiences: What Are They and How to Use Them

Published March 1, 2018
Imagine two people, one who is a loyal customer with a high lifetime value and another who has never heard of your brand. Now imagine these two people have a great deal in common in terms of interests, behaviors, age, and location. What if you could use the profile of your customer to connect with the relative stranger?
 
That’s what Facebook Lookalike Audiences are all about.
 
In this post, we will look at one of Facebook’s specific advertising capabilities: Lookalike Audiences. We’ll cover what they are, how they’re built, and how to use them.

Tips on Writing Facebook Ads for Business

Published October 26, 2017
Facebook has proven itself a cost-effective, efficient and powerful advertising platform for many businesses. The right ad can drive website visitors, increase event attendance and even lead to direct sales. For others, Facebook Advertising can feel like shouting into an echo chamber. You post, you boost and then you wait. Sure, the ad reaches people and maybe there is engagement but when you look to see how those interactions translated to website traffic, downloads or revenue the actual impact can be, well, disappointing.
What makes the difference?
There are a lot of factors and variables at play and while there isn’t a single definitive answer as to what makes a great Facebook ad, there is the composition of the ad that serves as the foundation of what you’re putting out into the world. In today’s article, we’ll cover some of the important guidelines to help you create more effective Facebook ads.

 

 

Megalytic Announces Support for Facebook Lead Ads

Published September 25, 2017
Marketing report tool now provides access to campaign performance data for Facebook Lead Ads.

Understanding Conversion Attribution in Facebook Ads

Published August 24, 2017
There may have been a time when a business made a Facebook page simply because “Dude, it’s Facebook, you’ve gotta be on there.” But as the social media juggernaut has evolved, so have the opportunities to use Facebook strategically to drive actual sales. But Facebook doesn’t just have the power to drive customers to websites, it has given us the ability to measure and attribute engagement and conversions.
We’ve talked about setting up Facebook Ads conversion tracking. In this article, we’ll delve further into understanding how Facebook attributes conversions.

 

 

Facebook Carousel Ads: Creating & Reporting

Published June 29, 2017
Let’s be honest, the world is filled with marketing noise. From billboards that line our highways to the ads that inject themselves into the middle of articles we’re reading. Ads are so pervasive that, as consumers, we find ourselves trying to filter out the extraneous media begging us to “look at me!”
We marketers will not be deterred though. We will not bow out. We will, however, seize every opportunity presented by advertising platforms to gain an edge; to make our voices heard above the din.
Facebook gives us the chance to speak to our potential customers in a way that can feel almost personal and differentiates our brand from the noise. But when you’re creating ads that will run in Facebook’s News Feed, you’re constantly competing for people’s attention against posts that range from dog videos to grandkid photos.
To stand out, you need ads that are visually engaging, that clearly communicate your brand message and, most importantly, drive the user to action. Facebook’s Carousel ad format may be the answer.
Carousels allow you to put an interactive ad in front of users where they can scroll through imagery, see multiple messages, and click through to your site. They’ve been known to drive up to a 10x higher clickthrough rate (CTR) when compared with standard image ads. You can use images as well as video to place your message front and center.
See the examples below for some creative uses of carousel ads. One is from Facebook itself promoting their Workplace product, featuring a sequential series of images touting benefit points. The other is from Reinvently, who use an image that’s broken into multiple squares which graphically flow into one another.
In this post, we’ll walk you through creating your own Facebook carousel ad and reporting on its performance.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?

The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.

Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.
Digital marketers spend a lot of time focused on PPC and SEO campaigns in order to drive desirable traffic to a website. The phrases we’re ranking for and bidding on get meticulous attention, so much so that we often forget about some of the other ways that visitors find us.

We put a tremendous amount of the effort we put into reviewing organic search data and PPC campaign performance in analytics. But how closely do we monitor referral reports?

If that’s not a channel you review regularly, you may be missing out on seeing traffic that is coming directly from links you’ve obtained around the web, local business listings, news mentions, and more. Many times, links are only considered as a means to an end, a metric that Google uses in determining how to rank sites in the SERPs (search engine results pages). But the fact is, many of a site’s links may be directly contributing to its traffic.

In this article, we’ll review how to look at referral reports in Google Analytics, and some of the many ways to use that data to better inform your web marketing decisions.