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How to Install and Debug the Facebook Pixel using Google Tag Manager

Published August 24, 2018
As a digital marketer, juggling a variety of advertising platforms is just a part of everyday life. From Google Ads and Facebook to Twitter, LinkedIn, AdRoll, and more, you’re used to having a lot on your plate.
 
But when you have to worry about installing performance-tracking tags and pixels on your website so you can optimize for each platform, things can get overwhelming. Not only do you have to add this time-consuming task to your IT team’s already long to-do list, but it creates a lot of additional code to manage, maintain, and update.

Google Search Console Data That Agencies Should Share With Clients

Published August 21, 2018
There are lots of ways to drive traffic to a website these days – social media, pay-per-click ads, display ads, email marketing, etc. But, for many websites, organic search remains the largest source of traffic.
 
As an agency, you need to help your clients understand what’s driving organic search traffic to their websites and how they can grow that traffic. This means you need a source of data that measures organic search traffic. For traffic from Google Search, there is an excellent free tool from Google providing that data: Google Search Console (GSC). While other tools "scrape" data from the Google search engine result pages (SERPs), GSC provides the official data from Google.
In this blog post, we’ll look at what kind of data you can pull from Google Search Console, how to use it for SEO, and how to best share it with your clients.

Building Facebook Lead Ads That Convert

Published August 17, 2018
Facebook lead ads are incredibly useful when you want to create a connection with potential prospects. You can use lead ads to gather emails and other contact information, provide quotes and estimates, get people to sign up for your newsletter, and just about anything else you can think of. The benefit of lead ads is that they help you engage with your audience on a deeper level by collecting contact information.
But how can you create lead ads that are more likely to convert? Luckily, there is a lot you can do to optimize your lead ads. Whether you’re new to Facebook lead ads or simply want your current ads to perform better, this post will help you improve your conversion rates.
 

6 White Label Reporting Features that Agencies Need

Published August 13, 2018
Marketing agencies now use many different software tools to do their jobs, including reporting tools. Some agencies worry that their clients might see branding from a tool company on their reports, misunderstand, and think that their work is being subcontracted. Other agencies believe that the tools they use provide a competitive advantage and would prefer that clients and third parties not be able to determine which tools are being used.
 
These are a couple of the reasons why agencies look a reporting system that they can “white label”. White labeling means adding your own branding to another company’s product so you can present a unified front to your clients. When applied to a reporting tool, this is called white label reporting.
 
White label reporting is important for your agency’s branding efforts. If you’re not including your branding with your reports, you’re missing out on an opportunity to strengthen your brand and add a personalized touch. Since clients will be looking at your reports regularly, that’s a lot of brand reinforcement. Also, if you offer an agency dashboard for your clients, adding your branding to that will also give a boost to your agency.
 
Furthermore, some of your clients may want to see their own branding on the reports. Or, maybe a combination of client and agency branding.

But what white label features do you need in your reports and dashboards in order to support your agency’s branding needs? In this article, we’ll be look at 6 of the most important. These are the features your reports need in order to serve as a face for your company’s deliverables.

Why You Should Run Campaigns on Bing Ads

Published August 9, 2018
As a business owner or marketer, getting more traffic and qualified leads to your website is likely at the top of your agenda.
 
If you’re like most advertisers, you’re spending most of your search marketing budget on Google Ads because it seems smart. Since they have the bulk of the market ( 63.5% share vs 24% for Bing in the United States), Google is a behemoth in the world of pay-per-click search marketing.
But if you’re counting on Google Ads to do it all, you’re missing out. More and more of today’s businesses are turning to Microsoft’s Bing Ads to enhance their marketing efforts and get a bigger bang for the buck.
 
If you’re not familiar with Bing Ads, you’re not alone, but we’ve done your homework for you. In this post, you’ll learn more about why you should run campaigns on Bing Ads and how do it effectively. 

Megalytic Introduces Bing Ads Integration

Published August 8, 2018
If you do paid search engine marketing, you know that Google Ads isn't the only game in town. With Bing Ads, you can expand your audience with lower CPCs and higher conversion rates than Google. And Megalytic can now support your reporting needs because we've introduced an integration with Bing Ads.
 
You can now put together comprehensive search engine marketing (SEM) reports that include data from both Google Ads and Bing Ads. And, in fact, our Bing Ads widgets work in much the same way as our Google Ads widgets. You can drag and drop Bing Ads widgets into a report and customize them to meet your needs.
 
In this post, we take a look at the new Bing Campaigns widget and show how you can start using it in your reports. 

How Agencies Use Client Reporting to Sell More Retainers

Published August 7, 2018
All new digital marketing agencies, indeed all new businesses, seek a steady flow of cash. In the beginning, this might be done by trying to get as many clients as possible. That’ll work in the short-term, but it’s a bad long-term strategy.
 
Working a constant stream of one-off projects is no way to make your agency’s cash flow steady. The way to overcome this is to convince your clients to hire you on retainer. To do this, you must show your clients that you offer value over time and that keeping you on-call is in their best interests.
 
How do you do this? How do you sell marketing retainers? It’s all about client reporting. 

How to Create Instagram Ads in Facebook Ads Manager

Published August 5, 2018
Whether you’re a digital agency, a marketer, or a small business owner, knowing how to advertise on social media is essential to creating brand awareness and attracting new customers. If you create ads for Facebook, you may also be running them on Instagram, even without knowing it. That’s because by default, ads created in Facebook Ads Manager are automatically placed on Instagram as well as Facebook.
 
However, it pays to treat Instagram as its own advertising channel, and not just another place to run your Facebook ads.
 
In this post, we’ll tell you more about how using Instagram ads can help connect your business to new audiences and boost your brand. We’ll also give you simple steps you can use to start creating Instagram ads in Facebook Ads Manager today. 

How to Share Instagram Access with Your Agency

Published August 1, 2018
There are a lot of ways that you might want to share access to your company's Instagram account with your digital marketing agency.
  1. You want your agency to run ads for your business on Instagram.
  2. You'd like your agency to boost some of your Instagram posts to achieve specific marketing objectives.
  3. You want your agency to create content and post directly to your feed.
Instagram advertising is handled through Facebook Ads. So, you can achieve the first two objectives by sharing access through Facebook Business Manager. In the third case, you will need to share your company's Instagram account password with your agency or else give them access through a third-party tool like Hootsuite or Buffer.
We've put together this blog post to walk through the steps in each scenario and provided screen shots to make it easy to follow. So, if you are ready to begin sharing Instagram access with your agency, but haven't known how to get started, you've found the right resource. 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.