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The Best Times to Post on Facebook

Published January 25, 2018

“Timing is everything.”

“It’s all in the timing.”

“There is a time for everything.”

There is an endless supply of quotes to reinforce the importance that time plays in all things. But when it comes to social media, these idioms are more than just clichés – they’re science.
There has been copious research to identify the trends that exist in analyzing Facebook post-performance, interaction, and when content has the best chance to be seen on the site. In today’s post, we’ll review some of that data to better understand how to use it as a framework for determining the best time to post on Facebook to engage your audience. 

Helping Your Clients Create Customer Personas

Published January 18, 2018
Who is your perfect customer? Where do they live? How much do they make? How do they spend their time and most of all, what problems do they have that you can help solve? All of these questions need to be answered, and one of the main ways a business can do that is through the creation of customer personas.
 
B2B and B2C businesses alike are constantly looking for new ways to understand their customers. The average client has a fundamental understanding of their own customer base but there are gaps in a clients’ perception of a client and what the actual data tells us.
 
In discussions with clients, most marketers will inquire about customer characteristics, demographics, and interpreted buying signals. But great marketing plans go further, they include the development of specific personas of individuals who fit into the client’s desired demographic, allowing them to shape their message, guide their channels and choose their best tactics.
 
Today’s post will walk you through the process of starting the personas discussion with your client, explaining why they matter, and how to guide clients through the process of defining them.

Structured Data for SEO: What It Is and Why You Should Use It

Published January 9, 2018
Have you ever wished you could talk to Google? Not with voice search like “Ok Google, find the closest Pizza Hut.” But communicate with Google about your content and what your website has to offer? Well, in a manner of speaking, that’s what some kinds of structured data are for.
Webopedia defines structured data as “any data that resides in a fixed field within a record or file.” For their purposes, Google explains structured data as “a standardized format for providing information about a page and classifying the page content.” So, while structured data, in general, has a much broader application to data models and programming, for today’s post we’ll be looking at it more from Google’s perspective and how it works with SEO.

Mobile Commerce Trends Worth Watching

Published January 4, 2018
Mobile website traffic has become a mainstay in reporting metrics. Across verticals, we’re seeing websites acquire more and more visitors via mobile devices than desktop. But when it comes to mobile e-commerce or m-commerce for short, mobile visitors are more than just a rising KPI. They are the future.
 
In today’s post we’ll cover some of the social and technical m-commerce trends that belong on every site owner’s radar.

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.