BLOG

At Megalytic We’re Thankful for You!

Published November 22, 2017
Here at Megalytic, we deal a lot with data and technology. It’s a world filled with insight and inspiration but there it isn’t often a world of warm fuzzies and sentiment. But as this is Thanksgiving week, we wanted to take a moment to reflect and express our immense gratitude to you, our readers and clients who consistently make us feel #blessed.
 
We wouldn’t be where we are or even what we are without the exceptional, intelligent and engaged audience we’ve had the good fortune to interact with over the years. So today we want to thank you specifically, for a few of the things for which we’re most grateful. 

Creating an SEO Baseline

Published November 16, 2017
It’s hard to measure how far you’ve come without knowing where you’ve been. With SEO it’s important to track and show growth over time before beginning any active campaign. This helps create a baseline that you will measure against as your work progresses. This baseline will give you the essential data to prove the results of your efforts.
 
In this article we’ll delve into aspects that are worth tracking in an SEO baseline. Whether it’s part of an audit or a standalone effort, these are some of the growth metrics you’ll watch over time. 

Google Data Studio vs. Megalytic - What's the Difference?

Published November 9, 2017
For many digital marketing professionals, new Google product releases feel a little bit like Christmas. We’re excited, we’re anxious, we’re wondering if we got the toy we really wanted or an ugly sweater.
 
Last May, Google launched Google Data Studio, providing limited access to create up to 5 reports. The teaser period gave users a chance to see what the data visualization tool was like. Earlier this year, limited went to unlimited, allowing users to make as many reports as they want. So, of course, we at Megalytic were curious.
 
In this post, we’ll go through some of the things that Google Data Studio and Megalytic have in common and where the differences are.

Reviewing and Reporting On Links

Published November 2, 2017
When a digital marketing campaign includes SEO, and it usually should, part of that effort will involve links. Anyone who’s worked on the ground in SEO will tell you that link building is one of the most difficult and important aspects of helping a site improve its organic visibility. That’s why link profile analysis and every link acquired should be recognized and positioned in a report.
If links are a part of your ongoing campaign reporting, they can be built into your SEO Template report. Remember to search engines, links are votes. The more external sites that are voting for you by linking to you, the better. However, there’s a caveat, of course. In SEO, not all “votes” are equal. Some are better than others, so when you get a link, it’s important to dig into the merits of each link.
But what are you looking for?
In this article we’ll take a look at this granular piece of the SEO puzzle and how to review and report on them. This will help clients better understand their importance and the value you bring by securing those links.
People who build links full time understand how difficult new links can be to get. There can be a lot of failure, rejection, and trial and error on the road to new links. So when you get one, it’s worth celebrating. Maybe hold off on the champagne for now, but it’s absolutely important to feature it in your next status report. Make sure you give a thorough review of the link by presenting it in full context.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.