BLOG

Tips on Writing Facebook Ads for Business

Published October 26, 2017
Facebook has proven itself a cost-effective, efficient and powerful advertising platform for many businesses. The right ad can drive website visitors, increase event attendance and even lead to direct sales. For others, Facebook Advertising can feel like shouting into an echo chamber. You post, you boost and then you wait. Sure, the ad reaches people and maybe there is engagement but when you look to see how those interactions translated to website traffic, downloads or revenue the actual impact can be, well, disappointing.
What makes the difference?
There are a lot of factors and variables at play and while there isn’t a single definitive answer as to what makes a great Facebook ad, there is the composition of the ad that serves as the foundation of what you’re putting out into the world. In today’s article, we’ll cover some of the important guidelines to help you create more effective Facebook ads.

 

 

Is it Time to Hire a Digital Marketing Agency?

Published October 19, 2017
You may have a list of reasons for keeping your marketing in-house. Maybe it’s, “No one knows the business like my team.” True. “Agencies are expensive.” Also, true. Or maybe it’s just that there are so many vendors out there you have no idea how to pick the right one .
But every business at some point has to take a good, honest look at their resource allocation and decide if there are some things lacking in-house that are worth the expense of outside help. When that moment comes, an inevitable question becomes, “is it time to hire an outside marketing agency?”
In this post, we’ll cover a few of the reasons and scenarios that are a good sign that yes, it is in fact time to look to an agency for marketing help.

 

 

Are You Ready for Google Analytics Certification?

Published October 12, 2017
You’re already a fan of Google Analytics. You know which data to pull, you know how to look at your audience, user behaviors, and conversions. You gather, analyze and present this kind of data month after month. Your clients, colleagues, and boss are satisfied.

Effectively Using Marketing Report Automation

Published October 6, 2017
Admit it – you dread the first day of every month. That’s when it’s time to start cranking out the monthly marketing reports. Whether you are a consultant, an in-house marketer or an analyst at a corporate agency, reporting is a mandatory part of the job.
And every month, it’s the same routine - you spend a frustrating chunk of your time exporting data from Google Analytics, importing it to Excel, massaging it, building charts and analyzing it so your client or team can understand the key takeaways. Or maybe you cut and paste screen shots into Word or Google Docs, add some explanatory text and format everything to look nice.
The problem, of course, is that putting the report together takes up most of your time, cutting into the precious hours you need for real analysis and insight.
Maybe you’ve thought about automating the reports, but it doesn’t seem possible. After all, your reports change each month. You’re not just cranking out cookie-cutter analysis here. Part of your job is explaining the impact of the latest initiatives, how they performed and using that intelligence to guide your next steps. You just wish you had a way to do it faster, without sacrificing the value.
We completely get it – but there are viable ways to have your analysis and automate it too. Let’s start with the basics.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.