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Updating Your Report Templates with New Data Each Month

Published September 29, 2017
Admit it – you dread the first day of every month. That’s when it’s time to start cranking out the monthly analytics reports. For your clients – if you work at an agency – or, if you are an in-house marketer, for the various departments that need data.
Every month, it’s the same routine. A new month rolls in and you spend the next several days exporting data from Google Analytics, importing it to Excel, massaging it, building charts and analyzing it so your client or team can understand the key takeaways. Or maybe you cut and paste screen shots into Word or Google Docs, add some explanatory text and format everything to look nice.
You don’t mind pulling together data for the people who need it – that’s your job and you like your job. The problem is the tedious, mundane work of putting the report together takes up most of your time, leaving precious little for real analytics and insight.
You’ve thought about automating the reports, but it doesn’t seem possible. After all, the reports change each month. You are not just cranking out cookie-cutter analysis. And you need to add commentary to explain, for example, the impact of the latest campaign and how it outperformed the last one. You wish you had a way to do it faster, without sacrificing its value.
Sound familiar? If so, let us introduce you to Megalytic’s Google Analytics Report Templates. These templates hand the grunt work over to Megalytic, while leaving you the flexibility to modify your analytics each month to adjust to new campaigns and other changing business circumstances.
Today, we walk you through the process of automating a monthly report in Megalytic and show how you can retain the flexibility you need.

 

Google Analytics Report Templates: Examples of Website Data That Matters

Published September 28, 2017
There’s no need to reinvent the wheel. At least, that’s what they tell you. But somehow it seems like every time a report is due, you find yourself back at square one. So maybe you’ve decided it’s time to find a Google Analytics reporting template that you can use over and over again.
Awesome. We can help.
It’s absolutely possible to build a reusable reporting model. But with that said, what you build should take into account several factors, and be easy to customize based on changing needs, goals and variables. To see Megalytic’s Google Analytics sample templates or to get easy, pre-made examples, sign up for our free 14-day trial . If you’re looking for ideas and inspiration, read on!

 

 

Megalytic Announces Support for Facebook Lead Ads

Published September 25, 2017
Marketing report tool now provides access to campaign performance data for Facebook Lead Ads.

Why You Should Switch to HTTPS Now

Published September 22, 2017
Website security is an issue that is increasingly finding its way into the mainstream spotlight. From data breaches to WordPress hacks, most websites have found themselves wrestling to correct a problem related to security. We’re at a point where all businesses must look for ways to improve security for themselves and their users.
There are numerous ways that websites and online data are vulnerable, and while it’s important to consider everything from malware intrusions to server side risks, one opportunity that every website should be considering at this point is a secure protocol.
In this article we’ll go over the many reasons why switching your website to HTTPS should be on every business owner’s short term agenda. But first, let’s start by defining the nature of this protocol itself. 

How to Present a Digital Marketing Report

Published September 14, 2017
When we’re given a gift, in theory, it’s what’s inside that counts. Does it matter if it’s packaged in elaborate gift wrap or plain brown paper? Does it matter if something is hand delivered by a friend or sent via UPS? No, it’s the gift (or even the thought) that counts. But let’s be honest – it’s not that simple when it comes to monthly digital marketing reports for your boss or client. Even if the work is exceptional and the results are amazing, without the right packaging and delivery, the real value of what you’re giving may be lost.
So, how do you present a digital marketing report in a way that ensures the meaning of the message isn’t lost because of the way it’s delivered? In this article we’ll cover some of the ways to create and deliver reports the strongest way possible.

 

 

Local SEO Reporting Ideas

Published September 7, 2017
Sometimes a website’s audience is global and we want to cast the widest net possible to attract visitors online. But sometimes what really matters in terms of data is a little closer to home. For example, a business based in Florida might find it cool that its website gets visitors from Bali, but it’s probably not going to result in an in-store customer or service call.
When a web user’s proximity to a physical location defines whether or not they can be a viable customer, local SEO is going to be a critical component of an overall marketing campaign. In this article we’ll provide a few ideas on how to report on your efforts as they pertain to a website’s local performance.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.