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How to Set Up a Google Analytics Account

Published June 1, 2017
You’ve launched a website, but now you need to know how people are using it. You need to answer important questions like, how many people are visiting the site each day? What topics are they looking for once they arrive? How are they getting there and how much time are they spending? Google Analytics can answer all of these questions and many more with the installation of a simple code.
Google Analytics is a seemingly endless source of data and insight. But you can’t get the benefits until you have it set up properly, and if you’re new to digital marketing that first step can seem daunting.
So we’re here to demystify the process for beginners.
In this article, we’ll walk through creating a Google Analytics account, adding the code to your site, testing the installation, sharing access with appropriate stakeholders and setting up goal tracking.

 

 

Five Ways to Use Video in Online Advertising

Published May 26, 2017
From television, to movies, to the Internet, video may have killed the radio star, but it gave birth to a new generation of media. In the last several decades, video has become a critical component of entertainment, education and, of course, advertising.
Why? Because it works.
Video allows you to grab users’ attention by engaging them both visually and audibly. It’s also in high demand, people want to consume video content and actively seek it out. YouTube users are watching over 5 billion videos every day.
Further, it’s an effective multi-platform media. People aren’t just watching videos on their phones; 2 out of 3 YouTube viewers say they watch YouTube on a TV screen, according to Google’s research. You can truly reach people across all devices, from the smallest phone to the largest TV, with video ads.
But integrating video into online advertising strategy entails much more than simply uploading the same brand spots used on traditional TV. In this article, we’ll cover five ways that you can use video in your online advertising efforts to supplement campaigns running via other channels.

 

 

Facebook Ad Metrics You Should Care About

Published May 18, 2017
How can you tell if a Facebook campaign is effective? Is it how many eyes were on an ad? Is it how many people engaged? Or, how many people wound up on your website after seeing an ad? It could be any or all of the above. The level of success you achieve depends largely on your end goals. Your success in communicating the results depends on your ability to decipher Facebook metrics.
While that sounds simple enough, when you start looking at Facebook ad metrics, the options can quickly become overwhelming. When analyzing ad campaigns many digital marketers, familiar with other platforms like AdWords, may look for familiar metrics like clicks, impressions, and CTR (click-through rate). But Facebook has a system all its own.
At the time of writing, you can report on eight different types of clicks within the Facebook interface: Link Clicks, Unique Link Clicks, Outbound Clicks, Button Clicks, Clicks (All), Unique Clicks (All), Social Clicks (All), and Unique Social Clicks (All). For some of these click categories, you can also measure CTR (click-through rate) and CPC (cost per click).
You can see how the data can quickly get confusing, especially after looking at the long list of terms in Facebook’s glossary. How do you know what types of clicks (and other metrics) to include in your client reports?
In this article, we’ll review the most important metrics for Facebook ads, as well as how to relate those to client reporting efforts. Let’s start with clicks.

 

 

Using Custom Channel Groupings in Google Analytics

Published May 11, 2017
Do you ever find yourself confused by some of the default names for metrics and dimensions in Google Analytics?
Do you ever wish you could take a closer look at the specifics of how users behave on your site based on how they got there?
No worries, you’re in good company on both counts.
Google Analytics contains an array of hidden secrets that allow you to slice and dice data in unique ways to meet your needs. In this article, we’ll touch on the names of metrics and dimensions and show you a method to customize channels in a way that is tailored to different types of traffic and marketing efforts.
Before diving in further, let’s start by defining some key Google Analytics terms.

Source indicates the origin of a visit, such as a domain (newyorker.com) or search engine (Google).

Medium indicates the broad type of traffic, such as organic (from non-paid search), cpc (from paid search), or email.

Channel indicates the higher level category of traffic defined by the combination of source and medium.

For more details on how Google Analytics categorizes traffic into channels, see our previous post about Understanding Google Analytics Channels.
In this article, we’ll delve further into customizing channel groupings to more accurately evaluate your data.

 

 

Multiple Language Support (May 2017 Upgrade)

Published May 8, 2017
Megalytic has customers all over the world, many in countries where English is not the primary language. Many have been asking us to provide translation capabilities, so that they can create reports in the language preferred by their readers. As a result, I am extremely pleased to announce that we have just released Support for Multiple Languages.
https://youtu.be/PT9PAmTsf1w
The following languages are supported, with more to be added in the near future.
  • Arabic
  • Dutch
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Hebrew
  • Italian
  • Portuguese
  • Spanish
  • Romanian
Megalytic users can set a default language for their reporting and override that default for individual reports. For example, a multi-national based in the UK can set their reports for English by default, but still publish reports for their European subsidiaries in German, French, Spanish, or Italian. Users can even create a report in one language (e.g., English), and publish in another (e.g., Arabic).
If you are interested in checking out these new language capabilities, sign up for a free 14-day trial and if you have any questions, feel free to submit a help request.

Reaching Users in Their Inboxes with Gmail Ads

Published May 4, 2017
Gmail, the email provider created by the search juggernaut Google, has over 1 billion monthly active users . Think about all of those people, checking their inboxes multiple times a day just waiting for a new message to arrive. What if your brand could use this massive user base to spread your message and attract new customers?
Good news! You can.
Gmail advertising allows you to show ads directly within your audience’s inbox, reaching people as they’re checking email throughout the day. Ads appear right above messages in a highly visible location, similar to an email subject line. You can put offers in front of people, when they are engaged, attracting clicks and sales without even having to actually send an email.
In this article, we’ll review how Gmail ads appear, how to create a campaign, and what tactics to use for the most effective targeting. Let’s start by looking at how Gmail ads show up in the inbox.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.