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Google Analytics Exports: Options & Strategies

Published December 1, 2016
Google Analytics is filled with meaningful ways to look at data. Sure, it can be a little complex at first, but the more time you spend there the more you’ll come to appreciate all the little things you can analyze and evaluate. The dashboards and interface are pretty user friendly too. What more could we ask?
Not to be greedy but how about getting that data out of the platform to tinker with it even more?
Let’s be honest. Sometimes, reviewing data in the online Google Analytics interface isn’t enough. You want to look at data in Excel, sort through fields, compare it and delete data that’s not relevant. Thankfully, Google Analytics thought of that, too. The exports function offers a way to download data for deeper analysis.
In this article, we’ll touch on how to export data, as well as some tips on using and customizing it for better reporting.

 

 

Tips for Building Your Data Reporting Templates

Published November 28, 2016
When it comes to data-based reporting, templates aren’t just a good practice - they can be a lifesaver! Using repeatable formats with plenty of room for customization is the key to maximum efficiency. In agency life, with a thousand things to do every day, efficiency is everything.
A solid foundation is essential to making templates work. Taking the time to build a strong infrastructure that will serve you and your clients is worth the extra effort at the outset. We’re here to help make that even easier.
So, imagine today is the first day of a new quarter. You need to start cranking out digital marketing reports for all of your clients. But where do you start?
Whether you’re just getting started building reports or have been creating reports for years, we want to share some of our favorite tips on building report templates that highlight your agency’s awesome work. Like everything, the first step is to know your goals, so start by thinking about the data that you need to include in a report.

 

 

Digital Marketing Solutions for Business Problems

Published November 17, 2016
Deep down somewhere, everyone dreams of having their own business, being their own boss and seeing their ideas become a reality. For as many reasons as there are people, most of us never become entrepreneurs. But for those that do, the age we live in comes with advantages and pitfalls to be used and navigated.
Whether you’re a small business owner or a marketing manager for a startup, you know that businesses face many challenges getting off the ground. Raising awareness about your brand, knowing what marketing channels to invest in, managing time and resolving reputation issues are all common to businesses small to large.
Thankfully, resources in the digital marketing world can help to solve these problems. In this article, we’ll offer a few tips for using digital marketing strategies to address problems that business owners and marketers far commonly encounter.

 

 

Who Should Have Google Analytics Training?

Published November 16, 2016
Sometimes, we still think of analytics as the geeky data for the analyst nerds. They love their numbers and their spreadsheets. The stuff that isn’t for clever writers, creative artists, genius developers, charismatic sales people, masterful account managers or fearless leaders.
Maybe. Maybe once upon a time that was true. But not anymore. Everyone, at every level, can benefit in some way from knowing how to log into Google Analytics and look at a report or two.
Employees throughout a digital marketing agency should have some degree of training in Google Analytics. While it’s tempting to assume that only staff directly managing projects like reporting or managing AdWords campaigns need this knowledge, relying on those front line analysts to “deliver the message” can sometimes work the same way as a game of telephone.
Google Analytics expertise is invaluable for people across the company. In this article, we’ll talk about how analytics knowledge ties into the daily routines of individuals in positions outside of the obvious SEO, PPC, and Analytics staff, with examples of how the data can be used for each.

 

 

Building Trust with Data Analytics

Published November 9, 2016
Readers of this blog know that I feel reporting is a hugely beneficial because it helps to build trust between marketers and their clients. This is true for in-house marketers and their internal clients as well as agencies and their external clients.

Recently, I was interviewed on this topic, and I recommend you check it out because it reflects really well how I feel about the importance of data for trust: Building Trust with Data Analytics.

 

 

What Can Google Analytics Track? 4 Surprising Customizations

Published November 3, 2016
The words “custom made” have become almost synonymous with quality. In a world where everything from email communication to browser preferences are personalized, we have almost come to expect to have our individual needs and preferences met everywhere we go. Google gets that. Google knows that it’s not enough to get personalized search results on the front end, you need more control and more customization of your data, too.
The Google Analytics interface offers a wealth of information through its built-in reports, especially once you know the top analytics reports to watch. But there are many times you want to see data you just can’t view in these standard reports.
No worries, Google has you covered.
Thankfully, customizing Google Analytics can allow you to track results on a level beyond what you get in the default reports. You can use features like Segments and Custom Reports to get more information, as well as using some backend features that you may not be aware of. In this post, we’ll show you a few tips to better track data that is specific to your business metrics in order to get more granular with your analysis.

 

 

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.