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Translating Business Goals to Analytics Goals

Published June 27, 2014
Analytics goals are the cornerstone of actionable measurement. But, as a business or an agency, how do you get there? How do you take your business goals and translate them into analytics goals that can be used to produce actionable insight that improve your business?
This post provides a framework you can use to translate your company’s business goals into analytics goals.

Using Analytics to Plan Content

Published June 25, 2014
Many of us use analytics to measure the activity that has taken place on our site. We look at how a customer got from Point A to Point B. We follow what they read, how long they were on the site, where they traveled and where they came from. We use analytics to report on the process of converting a visitor into a customer. But analytics can do more than just report what happened – it can be used to inform future decisions and future site planning. Like the content you’re putting on that site.

Ecommerce Tracking in Universal Analytics

Published June 20, 2014
Sites upgrading to Universal Analytics have three choices for implementing Ecommerce tracking.

1. You can leave your tracking code as-is.
2. You can upgrade to Universal Analytics tracking.
3. You can upgrade to Enhanced Ecommerce for Google Analytics.

In this post, we look at the pros and cons of each choice and help you navigate the options to make the best decision for your Ecommerce site.

Bringing Analytics to Your Digital Agency

Published June 17, 2014

You understand the importance of using analytics to inform business decisions. If you didn’t, you wouldn’t be reading this. Maybe you’re the person responsible for passing on key insights to your executive team or you’re the pay per click specialist who A/B tests landing pages or the search engine optimization professional looking at page speed to help you diagnose technical issues. Whatever your position or job title, you are someone who believes in analytics.

Upgrading to Universal Analytics

Published June 13, 2014

Today, your audience accesses your website from multiple devices – desktops, tablets, phones, game devices and maybe even other consoles. With so many new user touchpoints, the measurement challenge for marketers has grown. We need to understand user behavior across these devices.

Google’s upgrade to Analytics addresses these challenges. This post describes why you should upgrade and how to do it effectively, even if you have a complex site with lots of custom tracking code.

Stop Tracking Visits. Start Tracking Users.

Published June 11, 2014
There was a time when we tracked the number of visits to our website. When we installed web counters, impressed our bosses with “hits” and we were blissfully unaware of our inability to tie actions together to tell a story. We weren’t measuring what visitors did on our site, what they wanted or how we could better serve them. We were simply measuring our ability to get them there. With that came a great limitation in our ability to understand how to create more effective websites.

But that was then.

Stop Tracking Visits. Start Tracking Users

Measure Blog Marketing Success with Cohorts in Google Analytics

Published June 6, 2014
People may visit your blog, but do they come back regularly, engage with your product content and convert into customers? One goal of blog marketing is to increase awareness of your product and drive qualified traffic to your product site. In Google Analytics, you can use cohort analysis to measure success and achieve that goal.

White Label Email - New Megalytic Feature Added Today

Published June 4, 2014
Megalytic reports can now be sent from your own email address. This is the latest addition to our suite of White Label Reporting Options. You can now automate your monthly client reporting and have Megalytic email out all the reports from your company's email address.

ALSO IN THIS BLOG

Remember how your mom told you not to stand too close to the television because it might hurt your eyes?
The same rules can apply to data. If you’re too close, you may miss the patterns and trends that are crucial to understanding your website’s performance. You can’t judge a site’s performance looking at data in the bubble of a single day, you must consider any day’s traffic compared to the days before and after.
Google Analytics makes it fairly easy to analyze trends over long periods of time. But it also allows you to stand right in front of that TV, to look at more granular levels of time, right down to the hour.
There’s a better way to get that close to the data, without burning your retinas. We’ll cover how to analyze traffic effectively in today’s post.

 

 

When the client first came to you, you talked up the value of Google Analytics. You emphasized the importance of seeing where your traffic was coming from. You went on and on about how Google Analytics can show traffic sources to pinpoint whether people came from search, social media or a specific site referral, and how valuable this data was. You sold them on it, so much so that your client looked forward to receiving that first report, the magical day when they would finally understand where visitors were coming from.
But then the report came, and it looked like this:

 

 

It showed that 10% of your client’s traffic came from “(direct)/(none)”. What does this label mean? How do you explain Direct traffic to your client? Better yet, how do you explain “none”?
Let’s take a closer look at understanding Direct traffic in Google Analytics and how we can address it with clients.
One of the most exciting and important aspects of digital marketing is the ability to understand exactly how your customers are finding you. It informs every single part of integrated campaigns and helps determine which efforts are working and which ones need to be revisited. Google Analytics allows you to zero in on the performances of different marketing channels to evaluate everything from brand awareness to social media messaging. To get the most insight from that data, it’s crucial to understand exactly how Google sorts your traffic.
Channels in Google Analytics are high-level categories indicating how people found your site. While the Source/Medium report shows you in more detail where people came from, Channels are broader, more “user-friendly” names lumping visits together in buckets useful for high-level reporting categories.
For instance, Facebook Sessions often show up in multiple ways in the Source/Medium report. They may appear as facebook.com, m.facebook.com, and l.facebook.com, all of which are variations of the same source. The Channels report will include all of these in the Social bucket, so you can see less granular, aggregate numbers on social media performance.